FAQ Friday: Who has priority to be guardian?

faq brownFAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)

 

FAQ:  Who has priority to be guardian for a person?

Minnesota Statute 524.5-309 sets forth the order of priority that the court’s consider when determining who should be appointed as a person’s guardian.

The statute provides the order of priority as follows:

(1) a guardian, other than a temporary or emergency guardian, currently acting for the respondent in this state or elsewhere;

(2) a health care agent appointed by the respondent in a health care directive that does not include limitations on the nomination of the health care agent as a guardian and is executed pursuant to chapter 145C;

(3) the spouse of the respondent or a person nominated by will or other signed writing executed in the same manner as a health care directive pursuant to chapter 145C of a deceased spouse;

(4) an adult child of the respondent;

(5) a parent of the respondent, or an individual nominated by will or other signed writing executed in the same manner as a health care directive pursuant to chapter 145C of a deceased parent;

(6) an adult with whom the respondent has resided for more than six months before the filing of the petition;

(7) an adult who is related to the respondent by blood, adoption, or marriage; and

(8) any other adult or a professional guardian.

However, it is important to note that the court may disregard the priority scheme and appointment someone else, if the court determines that it is in the best interest of the ward to do so.

FAQ Friday: Can a Guardian “Quit”?

faqFAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)
FAQ:  Can a guardian just quit, or is court approval required.

A guardian who is appointed by the Court may not just “quit” or resign.  Court approval is required.  See Minn. Stat. 524.5-112  The Guardian, or an interested person, should file a petition with the court asking for approval of resignation and the appointment of a successor guardian.  A successor guardian should be selected in advance and named in the petition, or the court is likely to not approve the resignation request.

FAQ Friday: What Paperwork Must a Guardian File Annually?

faq brownFAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)

FAQ:  What paperwork is a guardian required to file with the Court each year?

A guardian must complete and file with the Court an “Annual Well Being Report” and a “Notice of Right to Petition For Restoration to Capacity” within 30 days of the anniversary of their appointment as guardian.   These documents are simple forms that are available through the Minnesota State Court Website.   These forms must be completed by the guardian (by EACH guardian if there is more than one guardian), a copy served on the Ward and Interested Persons and filed with the Court (along with an Affidavit of Service).  The statute governing these reports is Minn. Stat. 524.5-316

Although most guardians are able to complete these forms on their own, some guardians find it helpful to have an attorney assist them with it the first year that they do it.

 

FAQ Friday: Who are “Interested Persons” in Minnesota guardianship proceedings?

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FAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)

FAQ:  Who are “Interested Persons” in Minnesota Guardianship Proceedings?

Interested Persons are defined by statute in Minnesota Guardianship Proceedings.  The relevant statute is Minn. Stat. 524.5-102, subd 7, which defines “Interested Persons” as follows:

Subd. 7.Interested person.

“Interested person” includes:

(i) the ward, protected person, or respondent;

(ii) a nominated guardian or conservator, or the duly appointed guardian or conservator;

(iii) legal representative;

(iv) the spouse, parent, adult children and siblings, or if none of such persons is living or can be located, the next of kin of the ward, protected person, or respondent;

(v) an adult person who has lived with a ward, protected person, or respondent for a period of more than six months;

(vi) an attorney for the ward or protected person;

(vii) a governmental agency paying or to which an application has been made for benefits for the respondent, ward, or protected person, including the county social services agency for the person’s county of residence and the county where the proceeding is venued;

(viii) a representative of a state ombudsman’s office or a federal protection and advocacy program that has notified the court that it has a matter regarding the ward, protected person, or respondent;

(ix) a health care agent or proxy appointed pursuant to a health care directive as defined in section 145C.01, a living will under chapter 145B, or other similar document executed in another state and enforceable under the laws of this state; and

(x) any other person designated by the court.

 

FAQ Friday: How Long Does An Emergency Guardianship Last in Minnesota?

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FAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)

FAQ:  How long can an emergency guardianship last in Minnesota?

An emergency guardian may be appointed for 60 days, unless the County was the petitioner, in which case an emergency guardian may be appointed for 90 days.  See Minn. Stat. 524.5-311.

 

FAQ Friday: What is a Court Visitor in Minnesota Guardianship Proceedings?

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FAQ Friday is a new part of this blog where Spence Legal Services will provide answers to frequently asked questions on guardianships and conservatorships in Minnesota.  If you have a question that you would like answered for a future post, please submit it to Spence Legal via email (our contact information can be found on the “Contact Us” tab on this website)

FAQ:  What does a Court Visitor do in Minnesota Guardianship Proceedings?

When a guardianship or conservatorship petition is filed, the Court appoints someone called a “Court Visitor”.  (See Minn. Stat. 524.5-304).  The role of the Court Visitor is to serve the petition on the Respondent (the person for whom a guardianship is being sought),  to go over the petition with the Respondent  and to provide a written report to the Court about the visit.  The Court Visitor’s report will include an opinion as to whether guardianship/conservatorship appears to be appropriate, based upon the Visitor’s interactions with, and observations of, the Respondent.  The Court Visitor will usually call the Respondent, or the person taking care of the Respondent, in advance of the meeting to coordinate a meeting.  Sometimes the Court Visitor will make an unannounced visit to the Respondent.  The Court Visitor will make note in his/her report whether anyone else was present during the meeting with the Respondent.  The Court Visitor’s report is filed with the court and a copy is given to the Petitioner or his attorney in advance of the hearing.

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